Post Tagged with: "baseload power"

A Climate Win for Natural Gas: U.S. Carbon Dioxide Output Plummets

A Climate Win for Natural Gas: U.S. Carbon Dioxide Output Plummets

Thanks largely to the move by power generators from coal to gas, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions sink to 12% below 2005’s levels: EIA The natural gas industry along with its electric power generation customers have scored a big win for climate change – in the category of carbon emissions reduction. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions have fallen to a level 12% below 2005’s levels, the EIA reported today. Biggest reason for the big decline: decreased use of coal and the increased use of natural gas for electricity generation. Overall, the fuel-use changes in the power sector have accounted for 68% of the total energy-related CO2 reductions from 2005 to 2015. Two of the largest factors in year-to-year fluctuations of energy-related CO2 emissions are the economy and the weather, according to the EIA. Adjusted for inflation, the economy in 2015 was 15% larger than it was in 2005, but the U.S. energy intensities and carbon intensities have[Read More…]

Wind v. Natural Gas

Wind v. Natural Gas

Wind v. natural gas. Is it a race? To create electricity you need fuel. So you have to harvest naturally occurring resources—either the ones that exist above ground or the ones that exist underground. The underground resources—the legacy ‘go-to’ fuels that generate the U.S.’s cheap baseload electricity are coal, natural gas and uranium. The three fuels are responsible for about 86% of the electricity Americans use on a daily basis. However, coal is on the way out due to the efforts of global environmental activists, federal government policy, state renewable standards and the Obama administration’s self-declared ‘war on coal’. Natural gas has become the power industry’s preferred fuel when it comes to building new power plants, and highly efficient natural gas power plants are springing up everywhere as utilities replace older coal plants. There is a lot to be said for the above ground resources—sunlight, wind and water. They are “free” fuels[Read More…]